"Tooku Tooku" ("Far, Far Away")
Performed by: Noriyuki Makihara (Original Version),
                       Tomiko Van

Lyrics & Composition: Noriyuki Makihara

Arrangement: Noriyuki Makihara (Original Version),
                       Yuya Komoguchi (Tomiko Van/"VOICE 2" Version)

Song from at least:
[2 albums] - Kimi wa Boku no Houmotsu, VOICE 2 ~cover lovers rock~

»Layout Designed by: Oasis Heart3 (WAFTF)

»Translation & Romaji by: Oasis Heart3 (WAFTF)
»Lyrics Revised by: Kiwi Musume (WAFTF & Kiwi Musume's Lyrics Site)

Print Lyrics


Tooku tooku hanarete itemo
Boku no koto ga wakaru youni
Chikara ippai kagayakeru hi o
Kono machi de mukaetai

Gaien no sakura wa sakimidare
Kono koro ni naru to itsudemo
Shinkansen no HOOMU (Platform) ni matta [1][2]
Mienai hanafubuki omoidasu
Marude Shichi-Go-San no toki no youni [3]
Gikochinai SUTSU (Suit) sugata mo
Ima de wa warito niaunda
NEKUTAI (Neck-tie) mo umaku yoberu

Dousoukai no annaijou
Kesseki ni maru o tsuketa
"Genki kadouka shinpai desu." to
Tegami o kureru minna ni

Tooku tooku hanarete itemo
Boku no koto ga wakaru youni
Chikara ippai kagayakeru hi o
Kono machi de mukaetai

Itsudemo kaette kureba ii to
Mayonaka no koushuu-denwa de
Iwareta toki egao ni natte
Imamade yatte koreta yo

Donna ni takai TAWAA (Tower) kara mo
Mienai boku no furusato
Nakushicha dame na koto o itsudemo
Mune ni dakishimete iru kara

Tooku tooku hanareta machi de
Genki ni kurasete irunda
Daiji na no wa
"Kawatteku koto"
"Kawarazu ni iru koto"

Dousoukai no annaijou
Kesseki ni maru o tsuketa
Dare yori mo ima wa minna no kao
Mitai kimochi de iru kedo

Tooku tooku hanarete itemo
Boku no koto ga wakaru youni
Chikara ippai kagayakeru hi o
Kono machi de mukaetai

Boku no yume o kanaeru basho wa
Kono machi to kime takara

I want to give all my strength
And greet a shining day in this town,
So that you'll know how I'm getting on
Even if we're far, far apart.

Cherry blossoms are in full bloom in the garden;
They always are at this time of year.
I remember the invisible snow storm of flowers
That danced on the platform at the Shinkansen station -- [1][2]
It's like the 7-5-3 Festival. [3]
Even this uncomfortable suit
Looks kind of good on me now...
I'll choose a good tie to go with it.

On my invite to the class reunion,
I circled "Will not attend"
To all of you who wrote to me
Saying "I'm worried about whether you're OK".

Even if we're far, far apart
I understand
The full power of that bright day
When this town welcomed me.

When you said "You can come back any time"
On the payphone at midnight,
It made me smile...
And that's how I've managed to make it this far.

No matter how high a tower I go up,
I can't see my hometown --
I'm always holding in my heart,
Something I can't lose.

In a town far, far away
I'm doing well --
What's important
Is "changing"
And "staying the same".

On my invite to the class reunion,
I circled "Will not attend",
Though I really want to see everyone's faces now
More than anything.

Even if we're far, far apart
I understand
The full power of that bright day
When this town welcomed me.

Because I've decided that this town
Is where I can make my dreams come true.
Oasis Heart3's Notes:
[1] I was SO confused over why ホーム ("HOOMU") meant "plat(form)", and not "home". According to several dictionaries, it CAN mean both. So I asked Salinde, and here's what she said:

     "It's similar to how we analyze words that have multiple definitions and pick which definition is being used for a particular context. The 'home' use of the word is basically only used in katakana phrases like 'my home' and 'at home' (as in 'comfortable, homey') and such.

     ...[In these lyrics,] it's taken from the '-form' in 'platform' Japanese syllabic representations are limited and often inconsistent, and they chose to use 'hoomu' instead of 'foomu' for it."


[2] The Shinkansen (or "The Shink" as Kiwi Musume calls it) is a special type of train. According to Kiwi Musume: "The Shink is a very fast but very expensive intercity train (I've heard that in some cases you could actually fly for a similar price), so generally you don't catch it unless you're going somewhere far away".

[3] Shichi-Go-San is a special Shinto Festival for girls (ages three and seven), and boys (ages five and seven).